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Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions Statement: National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, December 6, 2014

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Publication date: 
Fri, 2014-12-05

Twenty-five years ago Canadians were shocked by the murder of 14 young women at l'École Polytechnique de Montréal. December 6th marks The National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, and the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions (CFNU) stands with the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) in calling for action to stop the prevalence of violence against women and girls in our society.

The CLC statement marking this day says: “Canada’s labour movement wants to help create a society where future generations of girls will not have to deal with violence, discrimination or inequality simply because of their gender. We want a world where girls and women can work and pursue their education and training without fear. That’s what fairness means.” “The Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions supports the CLC and is proud to be part of the Canadian labour movement as we take an active role in ending violence against women,” said CFNU President, Linda Silas.

This year, the Canadian Labour Congress is releasing the results of a groundbreaking national survey on the Impact of Domestic Violence in the workplace. This work, done in collaboration with Western University, is an important step in highlighting the fact that domestic violence does not remain at home. The CLC views this as the start of a conversation that needs to take place, and the CFNU encourages our members and all Canadians to be part of that conversation as part of the journey to concrete actions.

The CFNU, representing almost 200,000 nurses across Canada, also supports the calls by many groups for a National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, stronger and more effective gun control legislation, and a federal-led National Action Plan on Violence Against Women. Canadian girls and women must not fear for their safety at home, at work or anywhere in our society.

The labour movement has taken an active role in ending violence against women. We have worked hard to make work safer for women by addressing sexual harassment and violence in the workplace.

We helped win Canada’s gun control provisions in the wake of December 6, 1989, and we continue to stand up for effective gun control measures. Today, we are supporting calls for a National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and working with our allies to push the federal government to develop a National Action Plan on Violence against Women.

To learn more go to the CLC’s website: http://www.canadianlabour.ca

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